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. notwithstanding, for the past few years, the nsa has gone wild and conducted domestic surveillance on literally every single american, all 320 million people who have a telephone. that is wrong and unconstitutional. our founding fathers were quite clear on this point. the nsa has made a mockery of that. host: the first call from our guest to as a law degree from
an nsa agents were literally passing around the tapes of phone sex that had been made by servicemen to their wives. apparently, none of the nsa gens conducting that so-called investigation or ever punished. that is an illustration of the
, and a large database which is different than they nsa record and that pass them along to agents in the field. while this is perfectly acceptable, probably acceptable, to pass along the tips, what happens next raises questions. the agency has been instructed
trainedess to that,trai and abetted analyst at the nsa. if the numbers are run and it looks like there is a problem, the report is made to the fbi. the fbi looks at it and if they want to collect content, they must get a probable cause warrant from the foreign intelligence surveillance court.
is having his phone calls or e- mails looked at by the nsa. what they do is collect metadata. 2 phone number of calls made, time and date. all that information is stored. let's put that in the context of what is happening today.
, foreign governments, domestic wiretaps, and a large database which is different than they nsa record and that pass them along
-- as some have projected. the phone records of all of us in this room reside in an nsa database. i have said repeatedly just because we have the ability to collect huge amounts of data does not mean that we should be doing so. the collection of internet meta- data was shut down because it
provide-- warrant to content. nsa has produced an declassified a chart. it has the 54 total event. it includes section 702 authority and section 215 authority. it shows the events disrupted a stunning combination of these two programs. 13 in the homeland. 25 in europe.
requiring the nsa to send to the for its review the records of each query of the database as soon as it is practical so the court can determine the propriety of the query under the law. these are things that can be done to increase transparency, but not to stop the program. i believe, based on what i have seen and i read intelligence regularly, that we would place this nation in jeopardy if we eliminated these two programs.
it is a database that is different from the nsa database because it includes information collected lawfully from search warrants and subpoenas andsays the dea. if they are investigating you for drugs and they did a subpoena and got your phone records, the numbers you've dialed and the numbers you dial you would be in that database. if they are investigating me, they would do the same thing.
iteration is. we have a lot of acronyms and washington. it is a database that is different from the nsa database
audit that identified thousands of incidents in which the n.s.a. ran afoul of collections operations. the two democratic senators ron widen and mark yoo dal, both members of the intelligence committee said in a joint statement there are more dials come, "the executive branch has now confirmed the rules and regulations and court imposed standards for protecting the privacy of americans have been violated thousands of times eeach year" that's just the tip
call, every time i make a phone call, every time your listeners call into this show, the nsa gets a record of that call. that is what people are concerned about host: what is
was and how you voted. guest: the amendment was a pipe part -- bipartisan effort to rein in the nsa stuff domestic surveillance in violation of the constitution. i voted for and lobbied my colleagues heavily for it. i was responsible for the drafting of the letter that i personally circulated to literally a couple of hundred of my colleagues on the floor of the house. i made the argument in favor of respecting the constitution and respecting the rights of americans to their privacy.
of the nsa gens conducting that so-called investigation or ever punished. that is an illustration of the kind of abuse you can expect in a program that watches everyone all the time like a big brother. it cost a lot of money but few members of congress know how much it costs. as part of the so-called black budget, the budget that is kept secret even from members of congress, it is safe to say that it cost billions of dollars
declassified unprecedented information about the nsa, but we can go further. so the apartment of justice will underublic the rationale article 215 of the patriot act. and release information that entails authority and oversight.
the nsa to send to the for its review the
false testament about the nsa surveillance program during a senate hearing in march. his office had removed a fact sheet after concerns were raised. i appreciate it is difficult talking about programs in public settings. the american people expect and deserve honest answers create it is difficult to get a straight
it was harsh. how about those people who lied to the congress that represents the people about the nsa activities and bold faced lies saying they did not spy on americans? that is all i have to say. what you think about the sentence to reprimanding and what others would do if they provide that type of information? those in the future might provide this type of information to the public as well? caller: i would like to echo the previous gentleman's comments, and that is they did take an oath. at what point does your --scious do the right thing it is really a tough question. he did break his oath. at the same time, at what point is there a point when you should break the oath when it is for the greater good? >> usa today reflects hemlines and other papers. nsa admits new privacy violations. kevin johnson writing about the top intelligence officials here yen . there are other accounts of the story as well. theheard some thoughts on 35-year sentence handed down. you could make your thoughts known as well. kentucky up next. archie on the independent line. good morning. personally i think th
later when the nsa program has expanded so much. sideyou want allies on our , standing firm against islamic terrorism, after the president says the war is almost over -- i support the nsa program. we went through the nuances. apart from the isolationist the blameart from america first crowd in congress, one of the main reasons why we have a hard time maintaining support for programs such as the nsa is because the president has undercut us. he speaks in a schizophrenic way. he should be the one out there on national television. he should be the one of there, instead of talking about phony scandals, he should be talking about the speeches he has made about islamic terrorism and tell us why the nsa program is so important. [applause] we are up against a situation where people considered republicans or conservatives are defending a program of left of center president refuses to defend it himself. the country has to come first. that is why i believe a program such as the nsa, that as the basis for today's program, is so essential. let me talk about privacy versus security. menace of comm
of the nsa had actually caused inconvenience, damage, harm to un-american. i have not seen that story yet. wasve not seen a person who wrongfully identified to be a terrorist, was thrown in jail, given the fifth degree, and so on. there has been more inconvenience and damage to americans by the no-fly list and by taking shoes off in an airport then buy this program, which is precisely pointed toward finding people who pose threats to the united states, see who they are talking to, follow them up under court supervision to identify threats. stuff, this is potential we do not trust the government having information stuff. it is not real harm caused to real people by activities which are causing no good. >> i am not going to debate this, because i am not supposed to be the debater appear. but i am going to play devils advocate with you you. let us put it that way. i will take full accountability for that for our audience here and on the webcast. there are two things i would push you on. one is, how would you know if anyone had been harmed by abuse, given that the program is as secret as it i
. and later, nsa data collection. >> tomorrow night on the encore presentation of "first ladies" -- >> you would be invited into the dining room for the drawing room. dolly madison would have an unusual setting for the period and sit at the head of the table. her husband would sit at the center of the table. dollywood correct -- direct the conversation -- dolly would correct -- direct the conversation. there could be as many as 20 people served in the dining room. sheuld not be unusual. considered the dining to be more relaxing than entertaining in washington. >> the encore presentation of our series "first ladies." >> when it comes to telephone calls, nobody is listening to your phone calls. that is not what this program is about. as was indicated, what the intelligence community is doing is looking at phone numbers, durations of calls. they are not looking at people's names and they're not looking at content. >> these programs are controversial. we understand that. they are sensitive. they are also important. they allow us to have the ability to gather this chatter that i referred to. if
in place at the terrorist surveillance program that is now referred to as the nsa program, basically, what it did was it allowed us, and i am confident of the program we put in place and we have not been involved in the classified stuff -- but the program we put in place saved as general alexander has said at nsa must stop over 50 attacks on the united states and our friends overseas over the course of the last 10 or 12 years. we put in place the and enhanced interrogation program, waterboarding. some people so that was torture. i do not believe it was torture. ksm may have felt it was torture. the fact was that the enhanced interrogation program was signed off by the justice department using techniques we used on our and people in training, it was not torture, it was a good program that allowed us to develop the intelligence we needed to keep america safe for 7 1/2 years.[applause] and it worked. the record speaks for itself. the cia put out a classified report in 2004. ksm was subjected to enhanced interrogation. a report was published, classified by the cia, and it has been declassified
the watchers? what our left of our program tonight, the c-span out all looking at the nsa surveillance program. it comes to telephone calls, nobody is listening to your telephone calls. that is not what this program is about. what the intelligence community at phoneis looking number is in durations of calls. --y are not looking at names >> they are very sensitive and very important. there is a balance between security at liberty and all was a time to reexamine that. >> you have a police state, and much more dangerous society. others. the center and the privacy is being violated, just ask my constituents. >> there is more inconvenient and damage to americans by the no-fly list and taking off your shoes than by this program. see you there are talking to and in order to identify threats. >> they're out for the next five weeks, the august research -- recess. we're going to spend the next five weeks, three nights a week hosting a c-span town hall, taking your thoughts and comments on issues of public policy and politics. -- numbers we will take your calls in just a moment, your facebook comments, a
the nsa is scooping up information about americans, i do not think there is enough transparency. i think we can have more with endangering our safety. of they have a better idea how this court works. -- ao wanted to do another number of other new things. if somebody is going to be charged with a crime, whether it is dna evidence or something, does it meet certain standards so we do not have some of the terrible mistakes we have seen in the past? change the trying to way we sentence people. against mandatory minimums. this is a great idea when they are passed. it sounds better on paper than in practice. >> the fact that you have someone like senator rand paul joining you and senator mike new leaving and prove the chance for passing that sort of the bill? republican thought i have republican cosponsors. the organic farm standards began the huge organic farm movement in this country. a senior republican senator. ink we have become too polarized and to partisan -- too partisan. i want to get republicans on board here at a number of these liberal ornot conservative. it makes good sense. i wou
administration released new documents on wednesday on nsa surveillance programs surely before a senate committee hearing. officials from the fbi, nsa, and justice department testified about the use of the foreign intelligence surveillance act to gather information on u.s. citizens. this part of the hearing is under two hours. >> good morning. today, the issue of committee will scrutinize government surveillance programs conducted on the foreign intelligence surveillance act or if i said. in the years since september 11, congress has repeatedly expanded the scope of pfizer and has given the government sweeping new powers to collect information on law-abiding americans. we must consider whether those laws have gone too far. americans have learned that one of these authorities, section 215 of the usa patriot act has been secretly interpreted to authorize the collection of phone records on an unprecedented scale. information was leaked about section 702 of fisa, which authorizes the collection of to medications of foreigners overseas. i do not condone the way these and other highly classified progra
. question to my storingo who favor the of data records out of the nsa and allowing them to sandy phone companies. stay in the phone companies heard what weight do you give the factor we have such a litigious society that it is very easy for someone to go into judge,nd get a left-wing if you will, who will give a say , on injunction, and thus prevent the immediate availability of that information if it were allowed to be -- to remain in the phone company hands? there is a session court to up for that. you are dealing with just the fisa court, a judge -- >> you are talking while it is in the possession of the government, the nsa gecko what i'm talking about is -- the nsa? what i'm talking about is the dy made, taking it out of the nsa possession, allowing it to remain in five years in a phone company's possession. you're taking it out of and putting it into the civil courts, where the phone company is a subject to an injunction. >> general alexander and others in the nsa have discussed this. they have no philosophical problem with the phone company holding onto the records. again, their
, it makes it hard to defend a few weeks later why the nsa programs have expanded. when you want allies on our side saying it is important that they are by our size, and then you have the president saying that the war on terror is over. apart from whatever isolationist streak i have in congress, blaming america first crowd, one of the main reasons we have a hard time maintaining support for programs like the nsa is because the president has undercut us, and mainly in a schizophrenic way. he should be out there on national tv, instead of talking about phony scandals, talk about the phony speeches he has made about is monetarism and tell us why the nsa program is so important. we are up against a situation where the people who are considered republicans, conservatives, are depending the programs of a left-of-center president who refuses to defend the program itself. but the country comes first. basisa will use that as a for the program being so essential. privacy versus security. we face an enemy which is overseas and here in our own country. it is an enemy which is willing to carry out a
with x because the nsa gets everything. in accordance with the law, much more difficult to read all three of those have serious implications. >> m's first point on this. we have seen response to the leaks, al qaeda affiliated groups seeking to change their tactics. looking to see what they can learn and change how they communicate to avoid detection. ofi think there's a lot mystery about what ntsd does and its role in the larger counterterrorism community. let's talk about some of the central roles that it has. one of the changes that happened on your watch, mike, was the calling of names for targeting killing moved from the national security council in the pentagon to being centralized. there's been a lot of controversy about that. to the extent you could talk about, what is the role in developing and calling the targeted killing? >> it is an accurate. >> not entirely. i will narrow it a bit. fundamentally, the criticism we heard from congress and elsewhere, eric and others wrote about this. that you had in theory, the cia had a "kill list," and there was another list and it did not matc
"newsmakers." administration released new nsa documents about their data collection program. representatives from the nsa as well as fbi and justice department appeared before congress last week. this is two hours. >> good morning. today the judiciary committee will scrutinize government surveillance programs conducted on the foreign intelligence .urveillance act in the years since september 11, congress has expanded fisa, given the government sweeping powers to collect information on law-abiding americans. we must carefully consider whether those laws may have gone too far. last month americans learned for the first time the one of these 215 of the, section u.s. patriot act has for years been secretly interpreted to authorize collection of phone records. information was leaked about section 202. collectrizes the nsa to communications overseas. the way thatone these programs were disclosed. i'm concerned about the to oural damage intelligence capabilities and national security. it is appropriate to hold people accountable for allowing such a massive leak to occur. we need to examine how to p
's. hearing this week, is getting nsa information on americans, i don't think there is enough transparency. i intend to work for some limitations and have the american people have a better idea how the secret court, the fisa court works. i want to do a number of other things. senator corner of texas and i are working on a way to get forensic labs. if somebody is going to be charged with a crime, and there is dna evidence, there is at least certain standards so we do not have some of the terrible this takes we have seen in the past. i can say that as a former prosecutor. i have also tried to change the way we sentence people. the way the federal judges moved away from mandatory minimums. >> the fact that you have someone like senator rand paul joining you -- this week, senator lee is also interested in doing that. is this a new influx of libertarians leading republicans and improving the chances of passing that sort of bill -- >> i'm hoping so. i've always sought republican cosponsors. i wrote the bill for the organic farms standards, which became a huge organic farm movement in this country.
. that is unacceptable to most people. >> can we switch the topic to the nsa? this divide both parties. within your party, you see very strong defenders of the surveillance programs that are going on. i wonder if this is something you have gotten involved in. have you made a bridge or does not fall within your bailiwick? >> it certainly falls within my bailiwick on the official side. president obama talked about protecting our national security interests in protecting the american's privacy it is critical. i have spent time on this. i spent five years on the judiciary committee during the reauthorization process of the patriot act and has spent some time on the privacy and security issues. these programs, while in some ways they are troubling, it is going to make some uncomfortable. there is no question that those programs have given us an opportunity to prevent terrorist acts and those who would do americans harm. there appears to be no question that there are times when the programs have gone for their than americans are comfortable with. including president obama. that is why he has begun to release a
of the cia and nsa michael hayden talked about the electric grid and protecting it from cyber attacks. he talks for about 50 minutes. >> good morning. if everybody would take a seat. i amnt to welcome everyone. joe krueger, director of environment at epc. -- bpc.for those who don't know us, bpc was founded in 2007 by four senate majority leaders. we like to say we are bipartisan, not nonpartisan. we work with people who are strongly partisan of various parties, but who believe with good and rigorous analysis, negotiation, and respectful dialogue, you can actually come to agreement on policy issues. it sounds crazy, right? but it is what we do. i think it is needed now more than ever. cybersecurity really is a type of issue that can and should be bipartisan. we will hear from our keynote speaker in a minute that the threats are real, and we will hear that from a lot of the speakers today, and the potential economic and human cost of a successful cyber attack are potentially huge. so this workshop today is to sort of look at, are we ready for this? what is going on within the government and
or satellite provider. now you can watch us in hd. >> former nsa and cia director michael hayden, cybersecurity threats will get worse before they get better. he was one of the speakers at an event looking at vulnerabilities in the: trees electric grid -- and the country's electric grid. this is 45 minutes. >> good morning. if everybody would take a seat. i want to welcome everyone. for those who don't know us, bp c was founded in 2007 by four senate majority leaders. we like to say we are bipartisan, not nonpartisan. we work with people who are strongly partisan of various parties, but who believe with good and rigorous analysis, negotiation and respectful dialogue, you can actually come to agreement on policy issues. it sounds crazy, right? but it is what we do. i think it is needed now more than ever. cybersecurity really is a type of issue that can and should be bipartisan. from our keynote speaker in a minute that the threats are real, and we will hear that from a lot of the speakers today, and the potential economic and human cost of a successful cyber attack or potentially huge. so this
with russian president putin. it is in retribution to russia's decision to grant asylum to nsa security leaguer edward snowden. it is also first-rate with rush on an array of other issues including missile defense and human rights. says obama still plans to attend the g 20 summit, but a one-on-one meeting with president putin has been postponed. president obama will also at a stop in sweden to his early september travel itinerary. in a statement today, senator schumer, democrat of new york, praised the cancellation. "the president clearly made the right decision, president putin is acting like a schoolyard bully and he does not deserve the respect of a bilateral summit." the president is in california today. he appeared on the "tonight show" with jay leno tonight. he will be visiting troops at the marine corps base. we will bring you the president of the remarks live starting at 3:50 eastern here on c-span. >> ladies intimate, the secretary of state john kerry, and shaun casey, and the executive director of the white ande office of faith-based partnerships, melissa. [applause] >> thank you. tha
. the administration has insisted that it needs the nsa and its spying programs to counter the terrorists. we need to be able to look at few indications and sometimes that means scooping up matt said... my e-mail subject lines and dates. the leaks.ay include aren't you concerned that if you dial back too far on those kind of programs that the terrorist groups you're talking about going to be able to plan freely and perhaps attack the united r its interests? >> it is baloney. we have approved the following of terrorist communications from overseas, even those communications that go into the united states. when it comes to phone calls of every single american, they do not need to keep tabs on everyone of us us and what we are doing in order to support a terrorist attack, -- toward a terrorist attack that has an overseas connection. if we want to be 100% safe from criminals we could just get the police to give us the power to tell us everything of what we do and to come up to every house at any time. that is not the way our freedom works. into this type of threat, i would rather see drones overseas t
have posted and explanations. so i will talk to you very thatly about the nsa, and is something i have been very involved with, trying to rein in the out-of-control nature of what is going on right now with our surveillance programs, and that is something that i have spent, as you have probably seen from the news, a lot of time doing over the past couple of months. doing himsa has been as has been declassified now, is collecting the phone records of every single person in the united states, regardless of whether you are under suspicion of anything, so, in other words, the nsa has a database, and they actually collect every time you call someone. they collect the call that was made. they tell you which numbers were connected, the duration of the call, and they keep other sorts onwhat they call metadata your calls. they have been doing this for quite some time, but it was thently disclosed, and problem, of course, is they are doing it without any suspicion. it does not matter if you have a connection to a terrorist or not. they decided that they have the authority to gather up everyone's
is not a fan of big government, i share many of those worries. i'm asked constantly about the n.s.a. stuff. i don't know enough of what's going on. but i have this guttural reaction where, no, i don't want my data scooped up vs. the analytical counterterrorism side of me saying, i want their data scooped up. there is something to be had there, a conversation to be had there. i just say that, you know, when you have that conversation, you shouldn't let it -- and i don't think you guys do this, but some people i think now are defining the current threat environment and how things are evolving around the globe with the impetus to wrap this up because they want to declare it over and an end to it. s there's a danger that you go too far in your thinking in that and think you're just going to say it's all over with because i don't want to deal with it anymore. the bottom line is our enemy gets a vote. >> we covered a lot of ground. but there's obviously still a lot of ground we could cover. let me thank our two panelists very much. [applause] and thank you all for coming and i hope to to see you ag
that was disclosed that kicked off this whole controversy is due to expire tomorrow. is the nsa seeking a renewal? >> i have nothing to say today about that. >> will you have something to say tomorrow? >> i will. >> will it be modified? [laughter] >> i cannot say anymore at the moment. >> can i say something in defense of anthony? i want him to continue to love me. i think there should be an expectation of protection, of lawyer and client communications. that has always been the tradition. it is generally respected. there was a 1979 supreme court case referenced this morning. there is no constitutionally protected expectation that phone numbers called will not be disclosed. that is the basis on which we should begin to talk about this. but coming back to congress, congress can narrow whatever is the standard to go before the fisa court to get an individualized warrant.that's what the fourth amendment requires. --re was a decision i'm sure it will be revisited. it would have required that of the court -- that the case deal with specific facts creating a reasonable suspicion that a person is of a f
colleagues about the ramification of the nsa prism issue as that continues to be a topic of concern in europe. russia will clearly be a topic, and of course syria, egypt, the middle east and the unrest there. so i believe you'll see a very fulsome bilateral conversation, a more dynamic regional conversation with the nordic states. and i think it's an excellent preparation to get the president ready as he travels to st. petersburg to meet with his g-8, g-20, excuse me, colleagues. and matt, i'll let you take the baton. >> let me introduce matt real quick, really quickly. matt goodman here at csis holds our william simon chair in political economy. the simon chair examines current issues in international economic policy, with a particular focus on the asia-pacific. but i should also say that matt previously served as the white house coordinator for the east asia summit, for the asia- pacific summit, but he also served as director for international economics on the nsc staff and was responsible for the g-20, g-8 and other international forums. and with that, i'd like to introduce my colleague ma
that obama surprise visits on capitol hill with the head of the nsa said it canceled the committee meeting with obama and would probably never will get that investigated. thank you. albuquerque, new mexico. . weler: we do not, president, have an entertainer. he is on the airplane all the time. when he was first elected he told the country then the republican sen -- can sit on the back of the bus, we won. i would like to see him work with not only the democrats but republicans. person,am a hispanic and they better be careful, because all they're doing is using us. want us to vote for him, and then he takes us and the behind. behind. us in the i am so disgusted. i am 75-years-old. i have never seen my country being run up like this. kids cannot find jobs. people -- men cannot support their wives and children any more. he is advocating food stamps and welfare. instead of doing that, why doesn't he put on his boots, tighten his pants, and work with everyone, not just the democrats, but everybody, black, white, hispanic -- whatever. what difference does it make what your race is? we are all ame
have already declassified unprecedented information about the nsa, but we can go further. so the apartment of justice will make public the rationale under article 215 of the patriot act. and release information that entails authority and oversight. the nsa is putting in a privacy officer. and finally, the intelligence community is creating a website that will serve as a for further transparency. this will give americans and the world the ability to learn more about what our intelligence community does and what it doesn't do, how it carries out its mission and why it does so. fourth, we are forming a high- level group of outside experts to review our entire intelligence and communications technologies. we need new thinking for a new era. we now have two under -- we have to unravel terrorist plots by finding a needle in a haystack" -- of global communications. madewell, technology has given governments unprecedented capability to monitor situations.-- communications. so i'm asking this independent group to step back and review our capabilities, particularly our surveillance tec
database which is different than they nsa record and that pass them along to agents in the field. while this is perfectly acceptable, probably acceptable, to pass along the tips, what happens next raises questions. the agency has been instructed to create something called parallel construction. that is once they make a case, they act as if they never got the information. they might get a tip that a drug dealer will be in a certain place at a certain time. when an agent will follow a car and, they will make a pre textual traffic stop. they will find drugs inside but the only reason they need to follow the car is from the tip. the agents and the police and the field must recreate their investigative reports. they are supposed to leave out any trace that they got this tip from special operations. the problem with that say some critics is that that means the defendant will not have access to certain information that is part of their constitutional right to a fair trial. host: when it comes up in court, how is it explained by the agents? guest: the agent might be asked how this investigation
gamut. andas been counsel to nsa acting assistant director for national security and special counsel to the fbi director. his predecessor's michael leiter. he was the second director of the counterterrorism center until 2011. he is now senior counsel to the ceo of data analytics company. he is also a national security analyst for nbc news. with a very begin is, whatstion and that is the current state of the threat from terrorism? were does the emulate from and how serious is it? what do we start with it is great to be here. it is daunting to talk about it every would've talked about a lot of subjects today. i will give it a shot. topuld say right off of the the threat is very different now for what it was 10 years ago and even 4 years ago. thinking at a couple of different levels. as have been noted, the threat from al qaeda and afghanistan is really significantly degrading. we do not face the same rate as the same attack as 9/11. the group is really struggling to survive to recruit and train and operate. -- it remains at the vanguard of the movement. is still looks to for leadership
companies holding the records, rather than the nsa. as long as the government could get access. do you want to testify about that? is that a viable alternative? >> there are multiple implementations that could work. with that the score that against what we've seen at the top. we need to have the ability to, if you ask a question of the database where you have reasonable suspicion about a plot against the homeland, you want to check to see if there is a connection to the homeland. you need the brass within the database. when you get a response, you have found it in any particular location in the world. the breadth is important. so long as you do this in a timely way. --need to disrupt and from an operation that is in progress. there might be situations where you have time to take more time. we will have to think through whether or not our providers to meet that standard. finally, to the question that senator feinstein asked, our experience has shown that our intelligence, writ large, has a tail-off after five years. when you take a hard look at that and determine how long these things are ne
of you know is against the nsa program. nsa, health care, immigration reform, it is all on the table for members of congress. what is your message to them? greensboro, n.c., what do you think? >> i am calling about the town hall -- caller: i am calling about the town hall meeting that was played just prior to ,washington journal" coming on and it looked like a representative was playing to the fears of the people in the audience. i am sure that he knew what they were saying, but he was just giving vague information. one person stood up and said that his -- he took his son to the hospital because his son was beaten by a dog and he talked to different people at the hospital and the comment was, get rid of the federal government. instead of the representative addressing his concern, it did not make sense. like anperson, look elderly gentleman, said he was in favor shutting down the government's. does he realize that he is receiving any kind of social security benefits or medicare that that would be shut down, too? the representative did not explain it to him. republicans just look like
. and the life of nsa -- let's go pre-cyber. in the life of nsa, you always had a trade-off between the two squads. when you discover a vulnerability, do you want to exploit it to play offense or do you want to fix it to play defense? back in the pre-cyber world we had a pretty well-worn road as to where the line is. i am willing to enter into a debate that that line might not be in the wrong place. that the old approach to it, the old calculation -- i want to keep that vulnerability because i want to use it in the future might actually be technically correct, operationally sound in a discrete one-off decision kind of way but the cumulative effect of the discreetly correct decisions has been a real strategic problem that industry is unaware of of vulnerabilities out there. i actually think the trend line and the more we can accelerate it, the better. it will go too far. you know how it works. and we will pick it back a little bit. but i think the trend line now is in the direction of more defense, even if it has to be at the expense of offense. the degree of what we need to do with the tren
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 128 (some duplicates have been removed)